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The myterious lake of the Garnier Opera house

Paris is a city full of well-hidden treasures. Among them is the lake located under the Opéra Garnier. Did you not know it existed?

Place des Vosges, a place full of history

First of the 5 royal squares in Paris, the Place des Vosges is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful squares in Paris.

History of Stohrer, the oldest bakery of Paris

Today, I'm taking you to the oldest pastry shop in Paris: the Stohrer pastry shop, rue Montorgueil, in the 2nd arrondissement. A place that is part of history, therefore, but also a true ode to gluttony that begins in the window ...

Who is « Madame » of the « Rue Madame » ?

Rue Madame, Did often wondered who was this Madame ? It's now the end of this mystery, here is the answer :

Who is the inventor of candied chestnuts?

Since 1827, Maison Boissier has seduced the world over by the charm of its cases as well as by the delicacy of its candied chestnuts

A facelift for the Eiffel Tower

At almost 132 years old, the Iron Lady is about to return to her original color: a "brown yellow", imagined by the architect Gustave Eiffel in 1907. Cost of the operation? A trifle of 50 million euros!

Galeries Lafayette’s cupula’s history

Captivating the gaze of onlookers and customers for more than a century, it consists of ten beams, together forming an immense flower of 1000 m2 of stained glass, erected in a typical Art Nouveau style

The story behind the « passage of the queen of Hungary » in Paris

When you walk rue Montorgueil, in Paris, you can be intrigued by the name of this passage above this imposing green door: "Passage of the Queen of Hungary".

History of the « Opera », a classic French pastry

It's one of the most popular dessert in France, Opera is dedicated to chocolate lovers and is a beautiful tribute to the Opera Garnier and Its dancers.

A piece of history of Paris in the Marais district

In the Marais, rue François Miron, you can discover two superb gabled houses typical of old Paris, which date from the 15th century. They were completely restored in 1967 to bring back the half-timbered areas, the medieval-style shops and the gables. After the gigantic fire that devastated London in 1666, an ordinance obliged Parisians to cover their facades with plaster to limit the spread of fire, and gables, which also favored fires, were banned. Covered with plaster, these facades were therefore hidden from the eyes of Parisians for 3 centuries.

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