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The history of the famous Château Margaux

Château Margaux has been defined as the best bottle of Bordeaux wine by Thomas Jefferson, discover the history of this fascinating house.

The mysterious “Bal des Folles” of Paris

In the 19th century, the "bal des folles" (ball of the madwomen) was a very popular attraction, a social event that brought together all of Paris around women suffering from dementia, abandoned or simply fragile.

What was Marie Antoinette’s favorite food ?

It is said that Marie-Antoinette only pecked, but she still had favorite dishes.

A bunker hidden under a Paris station !

Hard to believe, but Paris hides in its basements ... a bunker ! A place as chilling as it is intriguing.

The strange passion of Catherine de Medici

If she was nicknamed "the Black Queen", it is because Catherine de Medici paid great attention to esotericism and astrology.

A piece of history of Paris in the Marais district

In the Marais, rue François Miron, you can discover two superb gabled houses typical of old Paris, which date from the 15th century. They were completely restored in 1967 to bring back the half-timbered areas, the medieval-style shops and the gables. After the gigantic fire that devastated London in 1666, an ordinance obliged Parisians to cover their facades with plaster to limit the spread of fire, and gables, which also favored fires, were banned. Covered with plaster, these facades were therefore hidden from the eyes of Parisians for 3 centuries.

The « galette des rois », A French tradition

On the first Sunday in January, tradition has it that it is the occasion to "shoot the kings" at the epiphany: a bean is hidden in the cake and the person who obtains this bean becomes the king of the day and has the right to wear a fancy crown.

One of the oldest house of Paris

In the Marais, rue François Miron, you can discover two superb gabled houses typical of old Paris, which date from the 15th century. They were completely restored in 1967 to bring back the half-timbered areas, the medieval-style shops and the gables. After the gigantic fire that devastated London in 1666, an ordinance obliged Parisians to cover their facades with plaster to limit the spread of fire, and gables, which also favored fires, were banned. Covered with plaster, these facades were therefore hidden from the eyes of Parisians for 3 centuries.

History of the king’s cake

On the first Sunday in January, tradition has it that it is the occasion to "shoot the kings" at the epiphany: a bean is hidden in the cake and the person who obtains this bean becomes the king of the day and has the right to wear a fancy crown.

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